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Troop Leadership Positions

 

Senior Patrol Leader
The Senior Patrol Leader is elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top junior leader in the Troop. By accepting the position of Senior Patrol Leader, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Scoutmaster
                                                       Specific Duties:
Senior-Patrol-Leader• Preside at all troop meetings, events, activities, and the Annual Planning Conference.
• Chair the Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC).
• Appoint the other Troop Junior Leaders (with the advice of the Scoutmaster).
• Work as a team with the ASPL’s to lead the troop.
• Resolve conflicts between troop members.
• Assign duties and responsibilities to others.
• Establish a plan for the SPL duties to be carried out in your absence.
• Communicate with the Troop Junior Leaders to accomplish the goals of the troop.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
• Perform any additional duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.) Resources: As SPL, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library

 

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader is the second highest ranking junior leader in the Troop. He is appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader with the approval of the Scoutmaster. By accepting the position of Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster
Reports to: Senior Patrol Leader
assistant-senior-patrol-leaderSpecific Duties:
• Assume the duties of the SPL (in his absence) when called upon to do so.
• Work as a team with the SPL and other ASPL’s to lead the troop.
• Responsible for assigned positions, to help teach their responsibilities and to
set task goals
• Attend the PLC’s.
• Help lead the skills instruction at troop meetings.
• Help the SPL lead meetings and activities.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)Resources: As ASPL, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop CommitteeMembers, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Patrol Leader
The Patrol Leader is the elected leader of his Patrol. He represents his Patrol on the Patrol Leaders’ Council. By accepting the position of Patrol Leader, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster
patrol-leaderSpecific Duties:
• Appoints the Assistant Patrol Leader.
• Represents the Patrol on the Patrol Leaders’ Council.
• Plans and steers Patrol meetings.
• Helps Scouts advance.
• Keeps Patrol members informed.
• Makes sure Patrol is prepared for meeting and events.
• Knows what his Patrol members and other leaders can do.
• Sets a good example
• Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law
• Shows Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.) Resources: As PL, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library

 

The Patrol Leader’s Creed
I will develop spirit in my Patrol
I will be cheerful constantly. I will be the fast friend of all the Patrol Members and be ready at all times to serve them. They can count on me to have a new song, a fresh idea or a stunt at my finger’s end and we will all be as thick as the Forty Thieves.
I will advance along the Scout ladder
I will steadily step up from Tenderfoot to Second Class, to First Class and through all the Merit Badges to the Eagle Rank, so that I may be a guide and perhaps the inspiration for the rest of my fellows to go and do likewise.
I will do a Good Turn daily
I will not let the Good Turn Idea be a thing like my best necktie, that I use only on special occasions. Neither will I automatically stop looking for and doing Good Turns after the first one of the day. Just because I have already done my Good Turn for the day is no reason at all why I should refuse to grab the opportunity to help grandmother find her specs or put ice in the refrigerator for mother.
I will live the Scout Oath and Law
I will remember always that I must be loyal and I will not misjudge Bill when he plays me what seems to be a dirty trick. And I will be exceedingly cheerful, even when it hurts, when it would do my old heart good to backbite and be sarcastic or even just plain grouchy. I will take time, once in a while, to sit down and think what it means to do my duty to my country … and to other people and to God… I will remember that it is a part of the Scout Law and make good old soap my constant companion. I will remember that it works just as well on my uniform as on my hands and neck and behave accordingly. I will be thrifty, even though it hurts and my heart years for an extra tennis racquet and I have just about twelve dollars in the bank. The best thing I can do, then, is to sock another dollar in there to make a lucky thirteen and go whistling on my way. I will be trustworthy and absolutely reliable always and my Scoutmaster may count on me to be on time for every meeting and hike.
I will lead my Patrol
I will remember that I am the Patrol Leader and that I am responsible for what my fellows do and how they act and I will take steps to make sure that they respect my leadership. I will plan carefully all my Patrol Meetings and the parts of the Troop Meetings for which I am responsible. I will take an active interest in all my Patrol projects and stunts and contribute my fair share of all Patrol work. I will be fair to my Assistant and train him in Patrol management to the best of my ability. I will be alert to the possibilities of all my fellows in my Patrol and will call upon them frequently to add their share to the Troop and Patrol work.
I will plan my work
I know that there is only one way to be a successful director and leader and that is to know what I am trying to accomplish and how I want it done. I will not hold a Patrol meeting without first being very sure that I know just what I want Tom and John to do in connection with the song-fest and the games the Troop is to pull at the next meeting, and how I am going to get Frank to see that he ought to pass First Aid to clear up his work on the First Class tests.
I will be generous and give credit where it is due
I know that there is nothing that helps a fellow so much as a word of encouragement and to cheer when he has done a job well. I want to be on the lookout for fellows who do more than their share of the work and let them know that I appreciate their spirit. I will not take credit for their work and when Ed has a particularly fine First Class map I will be very sure that all the fellows in the Troop get a chance to look it over and congratulate him on his work.

 

 

Assistant Patrol Leader
The Assistant Patrol Leader is appointed by the Patrol Leader with the approval of the Assistant Scoutmaster. By accepting the position of Assistant Patrol Leader, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role. 
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster 
Reports to: Patrol Leader
jl-aplSpecific Duties:
• Assume the duties of the Patrol Leader (in his absence) when called upon to
do so.
• Work as a team with the Patrol Leader to lead the Patrol.
• Attend the PLC’s when the Patrol Leader cannot.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As APL, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Quartermaster
By accepting the position of Troop Quartermaster, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster – Quartermasters’ Advisor
Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
QuartermasterSpecific Duties:
• Issue equipment to the Patrols and make sure it is returned in good condition.
• Receive damage reports and new equipment requests and convey it to
Committee Quartermaster.
• Make reports to the PLC on equipment condition once every three months.
• Maintain the Troop trailer in neat order. Label all storages boxes with
contents.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
• Perform any additional duties as assigned by your Advisor.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As Troop Quartermaster, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

Scribe
By accepting the position of Troop Scribe, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster – Scribes’ Advisor
Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
00430Specific Duties:
• Record the minutes of the PLC meetings.
• Maintain troop attendance records for Troop Meetings.
• Record Scout attendance at all troop events and give a report to the Troop
Historian, Scoutmaster, and Troop Scribe Advisor.
• Write articles for Troop Newsletter and Website regarding upcoming events.
• Maintain updated list of Troop members, including address, phone numbers
and email address.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
• Perform any additional duties as assigned by your Advisor.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As Troop Scribe, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Chaplain’s Aide
By accepting the position of Chaplain’s Aide, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster – Troop Chaplain
Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
Chaplain AideSpecific Duties:
• Plan and lead religious services at troop activities, such as Sunday services on campouts and invocations at Courts of Honor.
• Lead Troop in brief prayer at close of Troop meetings.
• Make sure that religious holidays are considered during troop program
planning.
• Make Scouts aware of the religious emblem program for their faith.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As Chaplain’s Aide, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders.

 

Historian
By accepting the position of Troop Historian, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster – Historian Advisor
Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
Historian3Specific Duties:
• Gather pictures, facts and memorabilia about troop activities and keep them
in an historical file or scrapbook.
• Maintain the Troop bulletin board in the Church.
• Take care of troop trophies, ribbons, awards and souvenirs of troop activities.
• Display troop awards, scrapbooks, and Rank Board at Courts of Honor.
• Update Troop website at least monthly.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
• Perform any additional duties as assigned by your Advisor.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As Troop Historian, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Librarian
By accepting the position of Troop Librarian, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster – Librarian Advisor
Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
librarian_patchSpecific Duties:
• Maintain a check-out/check-in system for all troop literature.
• Follow up on late returns.
• Add new or replacement items as needed.
• Collect programs and scripts from Troop and Eagle Courts of Honor for
reference material.
• Keep the inventory of the Troop Library contents up to date.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
• Perform any additional duties as assigned by your Advisor.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As Troop Librarian, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Troop Guide
The Troop Guide works with new Scouts. He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year. By accepting the position of Troop Scribe, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop.
The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster for the new Scout Patrol in the Troop.
Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
TroopGuide-300x300Specific Duties:
• Introduces new Scouts to Troop operations.
• Guides new Scouts through early Scouting activities.
• Shields new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts.
• Helps new Scouts earn First Class rank in their first year.
• Teaches basic Scout skills.
• Attends campout and works with new Scout Patrol when needed.
• Coaches the Patrol Leader of the new Scout Patrol on his duties.
• Works with the Patrol Leader at Patrol Leaders’ Council meetings.
• Attends Patrol Leaders’ Council meetings with the Patrol Leader of the new
Scout Patrol.
• Assists the Assistant Scoutmaster with training.
• Counsels individual Scouts on Scouting challenges.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As Troop Guide, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

 

Instructor
The Instructor teaches Scouting Skills. By accepting the position of Troop Instructor, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster
Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
instructSpecific Duties:
• Teaches basic Scouting skills in Troop and Patrols.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.)
Resources: As Troop Instructor, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Order of the Arrow Representative
An Order of the Arrow Troop Representative is a youth liaison serving between the local OA lodge or chapter and his troop. In his troop, he serves as a communication and programmatic link to the Arrowman and adult leaders and Scouts who are not presently members of the Order. He does this in a fashion that strengthens the mission of the lodge and purpose of the Order. By setting a good example, he enhances the image of the Order as a service arm to his troop. By accepting the position of Order of the Arrow Troop Representative, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Scoutmaster – OA Chapter Vice Chief
OA RepSpecific Duties:
• Serves as a communication link between the Lodge or Chapter and the Troop.
• Encourages year round and resident camping in the Troop.
• Encourages older Scout participation in high adventure programs.
• Encourages Scouts to actively participate in community service projects.
• Assists with leadership skills training in the Troop.
• Encourages Arrowmen to assume leadership positions in the Troop.
• Encourages Arrow men in the Troop to be active participants in the lodge and/
or chapter activities and to seal their membership in the Order by becoming
Brotherhood members.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law, as well as the OA Obligation.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Resources: As Order of the Arrow Troop Representative, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Bugler
The Bugler plays the bugle at troop ceremonies. By accepting the position of Bugler, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Assistant Scoutmaster
Report to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
buglerSpecific Duties:
• Plays bugle as requested by troop leadership, such as Troop assembly at
meetings and campouts.
• Plays taps during evening closing ceremony.
• Should work on completing Bugling Merit Badge by end of term.
• Set a good example.
• Enthusiastically wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Show Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having adiscussion, just ask.)

 

Den Chief
 The Den Chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts and Den Leaders in the Cub Scout Pack. By accepting the position of Den Chief, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Den Leader in the Pack and the Assistant Scoutmaster for the new Scout Patrol in the Troop.
dcfSpecific Duties:
• Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting.
• Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks.
• Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation.
• Assists with activities in the den meetings.
• Is a friend to the boys in the den.
• Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings.
• Meets with adult members of the Den, Pack and Troop as necessary.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Resources: As Troop Den Chief, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster
The Junior Assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an Assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18. He’s appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability. By accepting the position of Junior Assistant Scoutmaster, you agree to provide service and leadership to your troop. The responsibility should be fun and rewarding. This job description outlines some of the things you are expected to do while serving in this leadership role.
Advisor: Scoutmaster
                                                   Specific Duties:
• Functions as an Assistant Scoutmaster.junior assist scoutmaster
• Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Participate in a conference with your advisor midway through your tenure to discuss and evaluate your responsibilities and the performance of your duties. (Note: You can still have a conference with your advisor at any time. If you feel like having a discussion, just ask.) Resources: As Junior Assistant Scoutmaster, there are many resources available to you to help you do your job. These include people such as your Scoutmaster, ASM’s, Troop Committee Members, and other Scouts. Other resources include teachers, religious leaders, community leaders, and fellow junior leaders. There is also literature available, some of which is in the Troop Library.

 

If you want to find out more about the Troop Leadership Positions and Responsibilities click here.

 

 

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